Communism

Ottawa Memorial for the Victims of Communism

For those of you interested in Korean EFL topics, this will be a detour into Canadian society. A detour that may stay the course. You’ve been warned.

For those you who don’t follow the always-interesting-world of Canadian politics, this post is discussing a memorial that will be built in Ottawa. It’s a particularly turbulent time in Canada, and by default, Ottawa. There’s a federal election coming this fall (and of course, you know that Ottawa is the capital city of the country, and our federal government is in the city). We’re in the midst of partisan politics, American-style attack ads, and empty promises to get votes.

As the title of this entry states, the memorial is for the victims of communism. If you’ve been a long time reader of the ol’ Sanctuary, you can probably ascertain by the tone of my writing that this entry will largely be negative in its nature.

If you’re a newcomer to the site, allow me to give you some personal background info. I spent seven years living in a country bordering the last Stalinist regime in the world. While I lived there, the citizens of the country were threatened with nuclear warfare by said Stalinist regime. We were also bombed by them. And had a battleship sunk. I lived in the northeastern part of the country, and was a nice leisurely drive from the border. I was also a ferry trip away from former communist Russia, and a short plane ride away from currently communist China.

I’m fully aware that communist countries have blood on their hands. I know how these countries have been complicit in crimes against humanity. The millions who lost their lives to communist regimes should be remembered.

However, despite the word ‘victims’ being in the name of this new memorial, I have a hard time believing the sentiment is genuine. The Harper Government has spent a lot of effort in building a Canadian mythology. If this new memorial existed in a vacuum devoid of all previous context, then you might be forgiven in believing they have the victims’ best interests at heart. They do not. It’s all part of a carefully conducted plan to craft a new Canadian identity, and entrench old ideologies.

Since trouble sprung up between the Ukraine, Crimea, and Russia, Harper has attempted to appear strong in the face of Putin’s aggression. It’s nothing more than a ploy to shore up votes amongst the party faithful. If Russia actually decided to call Canada’s bluff, I have little doubt Ottawa would be quick to call up Washington, after biting off more than we can chew. Picking a fight with Russia looks good on paper, but in practice I doubt Canada would be able to back up its tough words. Harper’s increased posturing looks good to his supporters, and fanning Cold War tensions helps his efforts on that front.

If Canada genuinely wanted to support the victims of communism, we wouldn’t have signed a secret deal with China. That seems logically consistent, doesn’t it?

Before we build a memorial in downtown Ottawa to lash out at the crimes other countries have committed against innocent people, I have some alternative suggestions:

And by ‘memorial’, I am referring to something of the size and scale that will soon grace Ottawa, not some tiny plaque or footnote at a museum display.

If this memorial for the victims of communism goes ahead (and it probably will), I hope all the other ideas I put forward are given equal weight. But they won’t. Because that would go against this new Canadian identity that is currently being built.

Mers-virus-3D-image

MERS Update June 19, 2015

[The following is from the Canadian embassy in Seoul]

Please advise the embassy if you are aware of any Canadians who have been infected or in quarantine.

The Ministry of Health and Welfare (Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC Korea) has confirmed a total of 166 people diagnosed for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the Republic of Korea (ROK), as of Friday, June 19, 2015. According to the Ministry of Health and Welfare, all patients were infected while visiting hospitals affected by MERS. Over 5,930 people are still in isolation as of Friday, June 19, for possible infection after coming in close contact with a MERS patient or visiting one of the hospitals affected by the viral respiratory illness. South Korea has reported 24 MERS-related deaths since the outbreak was confirmed on May 20. Local authorities are closely monitoring the situation and have instituted appropriate measures including limited quarantines.  The World Health Organization (WHO) has not advised special screening with regard to these events nor does it currently recommend any travel or trade restrictions.

The Korean government has released the names of hospitals affected by MERS. There were 84 such hospitals as of 11:00, Thursday June 18.

*Hospitals where MERS case occurred (15 hospitals)

Seoul (7):             Samsung Medical Center (81 confirmed patients),  Gangdong Kyunghee Univ. Hospital ER (1 patient), Kunkuk University Hospital(1 patient),  Song-Taeeui Internal Medicine Clinic(1 patients),  365 Seoul Open Clinic (1 patient), Asan Medical Center ER (1 patient), Yoido St Mary’s Hospital ER(1 patient)
Pyongtaek (2):  Pyongtaek St. Mary Hospital (37 patients), Pyongtaek Good-morning Hospital (4 patients)
Hwaseong(1):    Hanrim Univ. Dongtan St. Mary’s Hospital (6 patients)
Yongin (1):          Yangji Seoul Samsung Clinic (1 patient)
Asan (2):              Asan Seoul Hospital (1 patient), Asan Chungmu Hospital(1 patient)
Daejeon (2):       Daecheong Hospital (13 patients), Geonyang Univ. Hospital ER (11 patient)

*Hospitals where MERS patient passed through (69 hospitals)

Seoul(18):           Hanaro Clinic, Yoon-chang-ok Clinic, St. Mary’s Family Medicine clinic, BSB’s NAMU Hospital, Seoul Bokji Hospital, Hwang External Clinic, KimJeongHo ENT Clinic, Medihill Hospital, Baeksin Clinic,  Mizmedi Hospital(ER), Duri ENT Clinic, Jungang External Clinic, Yonsei Neuro Clinic, Hyangginanun Internal Medicine Clinic, Siwonhan ENT Clinic, Somang ENT Clinic, Sejong Internal Med. Clinic, Yonsei Woori Internal Medicine
Busan (5):            ImHongSeop Internal Clinic, Busan Centum Hospital, Jahye Internal Medicine Clinic, BHS Hanseo Hospital, Good(Joeun) Gangan Hospital

Gyeonggi Province (23)
Anseong (2):      Hyeondai Orthopaedic Hospital, Anseong Hospital
Bucheon(2):      Medihols Clinic (Goean-dong),  Catholic Univ. Bucheon St. Mary’s Hospital,
Gimpo(2):                           Gimpo Su Urology Clinic, Yonsei Internal Medicine Clinic,

Hwaseong (2):   Sok-pyeonhan Internal Clinic, Hyangnam Yonsei Ped.& Youth clinic
Osan(1):               Osan Hanguk Hospital

Pyongtaek(6):  365 Yonhap Clinic, Bakae Clinic, LeeDongHoon internal Medicine Clinic, Yonsei Herb Family Medicine Clinic, Sae Seoul Clinic, Pyongtaek Purun Clinic
Seongnam (2): Seoul Rehabilitation Medical Clinic, Seongnam Jungang Hospital
Suwon(3):           Catholic  St. Vincent Hospital,  Cha Min Internal Clinic, Park Ped.&Youth clinic
Yongin (3):         Suji 21 Century Clinic, Suji Mirae OBS Clinic, Yongin Severance Hospital ER.

Chungcheong Province (9)
Boryeong (1):    Samyuk O-yonhap Clinic (released)
Cheonan(1):       Danguk Univ. Hospital,
Daejeon (3):       Eulji Univ. Hospital, Hansarang Clinic (Seo-gu), Hansarang Clinic(Jung-gu)
Gongju(1):          Gongju Hyundai Hospital ER
Okcheon(3):       Okcheon St. May’s Hospital ER, Gombawoo Oriental Medical Clinic, Okcheon Jeil Clinic

Jeolla Province (5)
Gimje (3):           Gimje Wooseok Hospital, Hansol Internal Clinic, Gimje Mirae Radiology Medical Clinic
Jeonju (1):          Jeonju Yesu Hospital
Sunchang(1):     Choi-Seonyoung Clinic (Jeollanamdo)

Gangwon Province (3)
Chuncheon (1):                 Hyundai Clinic
Sokcho (1):         Jinyoung Clinic
Wonju(1):           Yonsei Univ. Wonju Severance Hospital ER

Gyeongsang province (6)
Changwon (3):  Changwon Himchan Hospital, Gajok Bojeon Clinic, Changwon SK hospital
Gyeongju(3):    Lee-Woonwoo Internal Medicine clinic, Seoul Internal Medicine Clinic, Gyeongju Lee Dermatology Clinic

Be aware there may be incorrect media reports regarding the current MERS risk.  CDC Korea has established a MERS hotline : 109. Dasan call center of Seoul Metropolitan Government also provides the service in English at: 02-120 (Press 9 for foreign language service). CDC also opened a website for MERS information only. A good source of reliable information about this disease is the CDC MERS Website.  The WHO also provides regularly updated advice in English on MERS in Korea at http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coronavirus_infections/en/.  Information in Korean is available at the CDC Korea website  http://www.mers.go.kr/mers/html/jsp/main.jsp#  and in English, please refer to Press Release on the same site.

The list  of the hospitals operating MERS treatment Clinic can be found at: http://www.mers.go.kr/mers/html/jsp/Menu_H/content_H1.jsp?fid=5769&cid=63450.

Travellers coming to Korea can expect increased passenger screening measures at international airports, particularly for flights from Middle Eastern countries.  Individuals having medical concerns should consult a medical professional.  There has been no change at the present moment to procedures for entry to Canada specific to travellers from Korea.

As always, we recommend Canadian citizens to register with the consular section of the Canadian Embassy (Tel: 02-3783-6000). Registration may be made in person at the embassy in Seoul or online through the following website: http://travel.gc.ca/travelling/registration. It is important for you to register so that we can notify you about any emergencies and the follow-up actions we take to help Canadians. If you change your address, telephone number or employer or leave the country, please update your own record or inform the Consular Section of the embassy.
If you have already left and are no longer in the Republic of Korea (ROK), please send an email to our Registration of Canadians Abroad email address at roca@international.gc.ca  in order to end your registration in our system.

For emergency assistance after hours you may communicate with the Emergency Watch and Response Centre (EWRC) in Ottawa by calling the Embassy of Canada in Seoul and following the instructions. You may also reach the EWRC directly by dialling (collect call where available), +1-613-996-8885 or by email at sos@international.gc.ca

We encourage you to stay connected with the latest travel advice and advisories, via the web at http://travel.gc.ca, our mobile TravelSmart application, available at http://travel.gc.ca/mobile, and our RSS feeds at http://travel.gc.ca/rss. In case of emergency, contact information can be found at http://travel.gc.ca/emergency.

Embassy of Canada
Seoul, Republic of Korea
****

Veulliez aviser l’ambassade si vous ou des Canadiens ont été infectés ou en quarantaine.

Le ministère de la Santé et de l’Action Sociale coréen (Centre pour le control et la prévention des maladies, CDC Corée) a confirmé un nombre total de 166 cas diagnostiqués pour le syndrome respiratoire du Moyen-Orient coronavirus (CoV-MERS) en République de Corée, en date du vendredi 19 juin, 2015. Selon le ministère de la Santé et de l’action sociale, tous les patients ont été infectés en visitant les hôpitaux touchés par le MERS. En date du 19 juin, quelques 5,930 personnes étaient encore en isolement préventif après avoir été soit en contact étroit avec un patient MERS ou visité l’un des hôpitaux touchés par la maladie. La Corée du Sud rapporte 24 décès liés au MERS depuis le 20 mai. Les autorités locales surveillent de près la situation et ont pris des mesures appropriées, y compris la mise en quarantaine préventive. L’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) n’a pas conseillé projection spéciale à l’égard de ces événements ni ne recommande aucun voyage ou les restrictions commerciales.

Le gouvernement coréen a publié les noms des hôpitaux touchés par le MERS ; un total de 55 hôpitaux en date du 18 juin, 2015.

*Hôpitaux où les cas ont été diagnostiqués (15)

Seoul (7):             Samsung Medical Center (81 confirmed patients),  Gangdong Kyunghee Univ. Hospital ER (1 patient), Kunkuk University Hospital(1 patient),  Song-Taeeui Internal Medicine Clinic(1 patients), 365 Seoul Open Clinic (1 patient), Asan Medical Center ER (1 patient), Yoido St Mary’s Hospital ER(1 patient)
Pyongtaek (2):  Pyongtaek St. Mary Hospital (37 patients), Pyongtaek Good-morning Hospital (4 patients)
Hwaseong(1):    Hanrim Univ. Dongtan St. Mary’s Hospital (6 patients)
Yongin (1):          Yangji Seoul Samsung Clinic (1 patient)
Asan (2):              Asan Seoul Hospital (1 patient), Asan Chungmu Hospital(1 patient)
Daejeon (2):       Daecheong Hospital (13 patients), Geonyang Univ. Hospital ER (11 patient)

*Hôpitaux que les patients infectés auraient visités (69)

Seoul(18):           Hanaro Clinic, Yoon-chang-ok Clinic, St. Mary’s Family Medicine clinic, BSB’s NAMU Hospital, Seoul Bokji Hospital, Hwang External Clinic, KimJeongHo ENT Clinic, Medihill Hospital, Baeksin Clinic, Mizmedi Hospital(ER), Duri ENT Clinic, Jungang External Clinic, Yonsei Neuro Clinic, Hyangginanun Internal Medicine Clinic, Siwonhan ENT Clinic, Somang ENT Clinic, Sejong Internal Med. Clinic Yonsei Woori Internal Medicine
Busan (5):            ImHongSeop Internal Clinic, Busan Centum Hospital, Jahye Internal Medicine Clinic, BHS Hanseo Hospital, Good(Joeun) Gangan Hospital

Gyeonggi Province (23)
Anseong (2):      Hyeondai Orthopaedic Hospital, Anseong Hospital
Bucheon(2):      Medihols Clinic (Goean-dong),  Catholic Univ. Bucheon St. Mary’s Hospital,
Gimpo(2):                           Gimpo Su Urology Clinic, Yonsei Internal Medicine Clinic,

Hwaseong (2):   Sok-pyeonhan Internal Clinic, Hyangnam Yonsei Ped.& Youth clinic
Osan(1):               Osan Hanguk Hospital

Pyongtaek(6):  365 Yonhap Clinic, Bakae Clinic, LeeDongHoon internal Medicine Clinic, Yonsei Herb Family Medicine Clinic, Sae Seoul Clinic, Pyongtaek Purun Clinic
Seongnam (2): Seoul Rehabilitation Medical Clinic, Seongnam Jungang Hospital
Suwon(3):           Catholic  St. Vincent Hospital,  Cha Min Internal Clinic, Park Ped.&Youth clinic
Yongin (3) :         Suji 21 Century Clinic, Suji Mirae OBS Clinic, Yongin Severance Hospital ER.

Chungcheong Province (9)
Boryeong (1):    Samyuk O-yonhap Clinic (released)
Cheonan(1):       Danguk Univ. Hospital,
Daejeon (3):       Eulji Univ. Hospital, Hansarang Clinic (Seo-gu), Hansarang Clinic(Jung-gu)
Gongju(1):          Gongju Hyundai Hospital ER
Okcheon(3):       Okcheon St. May’s Hospital ER, Gombawoo Oriental Medical Clinic, Okcheon Jeil Clinic

Jeolla Province (5)
Gimje (3):           Gimje Wooseok Hospital, Hansol Internal Clinic, Gimje Mirae Radiology Medical Clinic
Jeonju (1):          Jeonju Yesu Hospital
Sunchang(1):     Choi-Seonyoung Clinic (Jeollanamdo)

Gangwon Province (3)
Chuncheon (1):                 Hyundai Clinic
Sokcho (1):         Jinyoung Clinic
Wonju(1):           Yonsei Univ. Wonju Severance Hospital ER

Gyeongsang province (6)
Changwon (3):  Changwon Himchan Hospital, Gajok Bojeon Clinic, Changwon SK hospital
Gyeongju(3):    Lee-Woonwoo Internal Medicine clinic, Seoul Internal Medicine Clinic, Gyeongju Lee Dermatology

Soyez conscient qu’il peut y avoir de la désinformation dans les rapports des médias concernant le risque de MERS actuel. CDC Corée a établi une ligne d’urgence MERS: 109. Le centre d’appel Dasan du Gouvernement Métropolitain de Séoul fournit également le service au: 02-120 (appuyez sur 9 pour le service en langue étrangère). CDC a également ouvert un site web dédié aux informations reliées au MERS. Vous trouverez une bonne source d’informations fiables sur cette maladie sur le CDC MERS Website . L’OMS fournit également des conseils, régulièrement mis à jour, en français sur :  http://www.who.int/csr/disease/coronavirus_infections/fr/. De l’information est aussi disponible en coréen sur le site web CDC Corée : http://www.mers.go.kr/mers/html/jsp/main.jsp#  ou en anglais, veuillez se référer au communiqué de presse sur le même site.

La liste des hôpitaux opérant une Clinique de traitement MERS peut être trouvé à: http://www.mers.go.kr/mers/html/jsp/Menu_H/content_H1.jsp?fid=5769&cid=63450.

Les voyageurs se rendant en Corée peuvent s’attendre à ce que les mesures de contrôle des passagers augmentent dans les aéroports internationaux, en particulier pour les vols en provenance des pays du Moyen-Orient. Les personnes ayant des problèmes médicaux devraient consulter un professionnel de la santé. À l’heure actuelle, il n’y a aucun changement quant aux procédures d’entrée au Canada spécifique aux voyageurs en provenance de Corée.

Comme toujours, nous recommandons à tous les citoyens canadiens résidant en Corée de s’inscrire auprès du service consulaire de l’ambassade du Canada en composant le numéro de téléphone suivant: 02-3783-6000. Vous pouvez également vous enregistrer en personne à l’ambassade ou via le site Web suivant : http://voyage.gc.ca/voyager/inscription.  Il est très important que vous soyez inscrits afin de recevoir des informations importantes en cas d’urgences et d’obtenir un suivi des actions que nous entreprenons pour aider les canadiens. Veuillez communiquer avec la section consulaire de l’ambassade ou modifié votre inscription dès que possible lorsque vous changer d’adresse, de numéro de téléphone, d’employeur ou si vous quittez le pays.

Dans l’éventualité où vous auriez déjà quitté et ne vous trouveriez plus au République de Corée, veuillez envoyer un courriel à l’adresse roca@international.gc.ca (inscriptions des Canadiens à l’étranger) afin de désactiver votre inscription.

En dehors des heures ouvrables, vous pouvez communiquer avec le Centre de surveillance et d’intervention d’urgence (CSIU) à Ottawa en téléphonant à l’ambassade du Canada en Séoul et en suivant les instructions. Vous pouvez aussi appeler le CSIU en composant (à frais virés lorsque offert) +1-613-996-8885 ou par courriel à sos@international.gc.ca.

Nous vous encourageons à rester branchés aux plus récents conseils aux voyageurs, aux dernières mises en garde et à nos coordonnées d’urgence sur le site www.voyage.gc.ca, aussi disponible via l’application mobile Bon Voyage, au www.voyage.gc.ca/mobile, ou en s’inscrivant aux fils RSS sur www.voyage.gc.ca/rss. Vous pouvez aussi nous suivre sur Twitter à www.twitter.com/voyageGdC ou nous retrouver sur Facebook à www.facebook.com/voyageGdC.

Ambassade du Canada
Séoul, République de Corée

Korean fans cheer on.

2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup- Korea vs Spain

Yesterday, I went into Ottawa. It was a day of firsts. It was my first time visiting the stadium at TD Place. What brought me to Ottawa’s refurbished stadium?

The title of this entry, that’s what. Yep, Korea was playing in Ottawa, and I’d be damned if I missed it. When I first learned that Ottawa was hosting some of Canada’s World Cup, I went searching for tickets. The best tickets available didn’t come cheap, and they came with a few caveats.

While I wanted to watch Korea play, I also had to pay for another game (or get it for “free”-depending how you look at it, I guess). When the first game ended, and there were 90 minutes to kill, you weren’t able to leave the stadium. I took that in stride. The main objective was to watch Korea play, and that’s what I set out to do.

It was the first time I used the bus service in Ottawa. Prior to all this, there was never any need to use the bus in the city. I actually ordered myself a Presto card (a card somewhat similar to T-Money, but you can’t use it everywhere like T-Money can be used in Korea), so I could use the bus system. However, the ticket to the game included full bus fare, and there were even dedicated shuttle buses to help stem the flow of traffic.

It was my first time riding a bus in Canada since 2006! They don’t roar down the street like they do in Korea.

The stadium itself was pretty nice, although the food areas had massive lines (and they ran out of poutine just as I made it to the front!). For whatever reason, FIFA wasn’t allowing outside water to be brought in, so I had to empty my bottle, although the guy screening backpacks said I could just refill it inside the stadium.

The first game was France against Mexico. Mexico got creamed, despite all the Mexican fans cheering their hearts out. I enjoyed the game, and I hoped Korea’s would be as entertaining. I figured Korea would fall to Spain, though.

As the game began, I had my camera out so I could put together a YouTube video. The last time I made a FIFA video about Korea, it went viral, but this time I couldn’t rush it out. I was also shooting pics for social media, and my students were engaging me on it.

If you missed the game, the video I made has Korea’s highlights. I missed the Spanish goal, but got both of Korea’s.

Click here, if you are RSS readers.

I had a lot of fun. I wore my Korean FIFA jersey from the Brazil World Cup, which was identical to the women’s jersey in Canada. There were a lot of Koreans in the crowd, and Korean Canadians. There were also a lot of tourists from other countries with an appetite for football. For a bit, it felt like I was in Seoul or Busan.

I’d like to go to another game if Korea, or Canada, plays in Ottawa again. It was a fun time for my first World Cup game. If you’re in the country, or near one of the host cities, try scoring some tickets.